Feb 18

Parents of Struggling Kids: What Are You Tolerating?

tolerating

What are you tolerating today?

As parents of troubled kids, it seems like we wind up tolerating a lot, right?  It could be anything from messy rooms, to drugs found in the house, to the milk left out to spoil, or argumentative language from our kids.  The list could be endless.  It might be anything really, anything that makes us even a little upset, anxious, feeling dissonance, or just plain wanting to get away from it.  If we are feeling any of those things, we might be tolerating something that isn’t quite right for us.  And that is worth examining.

As many of you know, I love quotes and often like to include one in my blog.  However when I went out to google search quotes about tolerating, I only was able to find quotes that promote tolerance, and it occurred to me that the meaning of ‘tolerating’ in those quotes is not really what I am talking about here.   So don’t get me wrong, I am all for tolerance of people and/or situations different from my own, be it race, religion, sexual orientation, etc.  That kind of tolerating is not my topic here!  (Just wanted to make that clear…)

What I am talking about is what we put up with on a regular basis that bugs us, irritates us, that if we could change, we would.  What are those things for you?

You might wonder why I am asking, why this is even worth mentioning.  Well, because it can be a good place to start, that’s why.  As you may know, I am all about helping the parents of struggling kids.  And I know for a fact that working on oneself when our kids are struggling winds up to be the best thing we can do for ourselves and our kids.  Oh what a beautiful thing that is!  I love the twofer, the double-whammy of it!  If you are tolerating something that isn’t the best for you, there is a really good chance it might not be good for others too.  Voila!

So I ask you, what are you tolerating?  I would love to hear it!  Please share in the comments section below.

 

Leslie Ferris is a Certified and Credentialed Parent and Life Coach

Serving the parents of struggling tweens, teens, and young adults

Contact her today for your 1/2 complimentary discussion to explore what life coaching can do for you.

Connect with her via her website at http://www.phase2foryou.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/Phase2ForYou

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/Leslie_Ferris

LinkedIn:   www.linkedin.com/in/leslieferris/

Click here for the Audio and Workbook – 4 Giant Pitfalls to Avoid While Your Child Is In Recovery - Plus the ONE Critical Fact You Must Know

Jan 27

Parents Of Struggling Kids: How Well Do You Know Yourself?

self-awareness

Until you make the unconscious conscious, it will direct your life and you will call it fate.” ― C.G. Jung

As you become more clear about who you really are, you’ll be better able to decide what is best for you – the first time around.” ―  Oprah Winfrey

Much has been written on the topic of knowing yourself since the time of the ancient philosophers.   Aristotle said, “Knowing yourself is the beginning of all wisdom “.  Absolutely, increased self-awareness has vast benefit.   And here are 3 big ones that can apply to everyone, and especially to parents of struggling kids:

  1. We can take care of ourselves better.  To know ourselves is to become more clear about what we need, what makes us feel healthy and good, and to realize that the best thing we can do for those we love is to take care of ourselves.  There is no better gift to our loved ones than to personally be all we can be – physically, socially, emotionally, and spiritually.  To be sure, we can’t give to anyone else what we don’t have ourselves.  (Download a great audio and workbook set for more on this topic! – click HERE)
  2. We can interpret our own reactions much better.   This will increase our chances of doing the most productive thing during trying times.  Without a doubt, with struggling kids, there can be plenty to react to.   The more we are in tune with our reactions, the better we can anticipate them, giving us a better chance of responding appropriately when the opportunity arises.  Great stuff. 
  3. We will know our boundaries and can hold them more firmly.  The more we become aware of who we are, what our core values are, and who and what we want and need in our lives, the easier it will become to know what our boundaries should be for ourselves and for our kids.  And the further good news is that once we are firm on what our boundaries should be, it is a lot easier to hold them!  And especially in working with troubled kids, boundaries can be quite a challenge.  So to get clarity on having and holding boundaries is mighty useful to all! 

And so I urge you to start on the journey of increased self-awareness in whatever way suites you best.

Are you unsure about how to get started?   Check out my Resilient Parenting Process, which utilizes the Energy Leadership Index Assessment and Debriefing as the kick start to your new self-awareness journey.  This assessment/discovery process alone will be an eye opening experience, worth it 100 times over for you personally – as well as for your role as a parent!  Contact me today to set up your assessment.

What are your revelations about self-awareness, and how has it help you move forward in a positive way in your life?  Please share in the comments section below!

 

Leslie Ferris is a Certified and Credentialed Life Coach

Serving the parents of struggling tweens, teens, and young adults

Contact her today for your 1/2 complimentary discussion to explore what life coaching can do for you.

Connect with her via her website at http://www.phase2foryou.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/Phase2ForYou

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/Leslie_Ferris

LinkedIn:   www.linkedin.com/in/leslieferris/

Click here for the Audio and Workbook – 4 Giant Pitfalls to Avoid While Your Child Is In Recovery

Jan 15

3 Big Lessons Learned from ‘The Dance of Anger’ by Harriet Lerner

Anger

It’s OK to be angry – really.  

I just finished reading The Dance of Anger by Harriet Lerner.  This is not a new book by any stretch, and it is not particularly written for parents.  It is written for women.  But I think it is applicable to all of us, and definitely to those parents dealing with a child who is struggling.  After all, in challenging situations with our children there is often anger involved, right?

There are so many things in the book and certainly I couldn’t cover them all, but here are 3 key points that really stood out for me:

1.  Anger isn’t right or wrong, it is just an emotion like any other.  It’s OK to be angry! Can I just scream THANK YOU a million times?  Have you ever been angry and then were told that you were wrong, that it was totally inappropriate or not ladylike, or that your anger was hurting others?  Well I certainly have, and so to read that being angry is permissible, OK, and normal, especially being a woman, was a huge relief.  So thank you Harriet Lerner – a hundred times over.

‘Anger is something we feel.  It exists for a reason and always deserves our respect and attention.  We all have a right to everything we feel – and certainly our anger is no exception’.   – Harriet Lerner

2.  Anger can be used as a signal, a sign, to indicate to us that something needs to change.  I loved the idea that Harriet Lerner conveys in the book about how our anger could be used for good, to improve our situation over time if it is used as a signal to tells us to investigate further what it is really about.  It certainly might take a while to figure that out, and like so many other things it is a process and not an event.  I have certainly found it helpful when I get angry or even irritated to ask myself, “What is this really telling me?”.  What a useful tool, and it works like a champ!

”Anger is a signal, and one worth listening to. Our anger may be a message that we are being hurt, that our needs or wants are not being adequately met, or simply that something isn’t right.” – Harriet Lerner

3.  Unresolved anger will affect another relationship that may be seemingly unrelated.

Oh wow, that’s a big one, right?  We have all probably made some connection between our parent/sibling relationships and our own behaviors outside that circle of people.  However, in this book she explains it so beautifully, and offers ideas/solutions to help – taking it to whole new level for me!   (check out her relationship triangles – great stuff)  After I thought about it further, I just had to say, ‘Um, yep – that’s right….’

“Issues that go unaddressed with members of our first family only fuel our fires in other relationships”. – Harriet Lerner

 

To be sure, there is more to this book than what I have listed.  In fact, it could be read several times and we’d probably get more/something different each time.   I highly recommend that everyone read the book, parent of struggling child or not!  There is something in there for all of us, should we choose to see it!

I would love to hear your take on the book, my 3 points, or anger itself  – please comment in the section below!

PS.  Do you know what ‘de-selfing’ is?  Read the book to find out.  I have done it, and I bet you have to!!

 

Leslie Ferris is a Certified and Credentialed Life Coach

Serving the parents of struggling tweens, teens, and young adults

Contact her today for your 1/2 complimentary discussion to explore what life coaching can do for you.

Connect with her via her website at http://www.phase2foryou.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/Phase2ForYou

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/Leslie_Ferris

LinkedIn:   www.linkedin.com/in/leslieferris/

Click here for the Audio and Workbook – 4 Giant Pitfalls to Avoid While Your Child Is In Recovery

Dec 15

The 3 C’s – More Ways to Add Meaning to Your Holiday Season – Even If Your Child is Struggling

Care, Connect, and Concentrate

Care, Connect, and Concentrate

This article is a ‘part 2′ to last week’s blog: The 3 G’s – How to Have a Satisfying Holiday Season – Even When Your Child Is Struggling.

As I discussed last week, the holidays can be particularly difficult for parents of struggling children, especially if the kids are away at treatment or are physically and emotionally estranged from us.  Having ‘fun’ is hard to do, and may even seem like an absurd notion.  In my previous article I outlined the 3 G’s to help us not only get through, but to have a satisfying and meaningful holiday season.

Today I offer more ideas with the 3 C’s, and here they are:

Care – for yourself!  Yes, that’s right.  Taking care of yourself is the best thing you can do – for you and for your child.  It seems counter intuitive, but it really is true.  Give yourself the gift of better self-care, and by doing so you will be giving to your loved ones as well.  You can’t give away what you first don’t have for yourself.  There are countless ways to do this, the possibilities are endless.

Start with downloading our thought provoking audio and workbook – ’4 Giant Pitfalls to Avoid While Your Child Is In Recovery – Plus The One Critical Fact You Must Know’.  Click here now.  The audio addresses this very issue, and it is a great place to start.  You deserve it, and so does everyone you care about!

Connect.  At a very basic level, we all need connection with other people in order to thrive, and yet as parents of kids who are troubled or acting out, we tend to isolate and thereby cut off the very connections that we need most.  I urge you to fight that tendency to retreat, and reach out to those you have been feeling less connected to.  Maybe it is a friend, a family member, someone from your place of worship, or somebody you have not seen in a long time.  Make the effort, and you will reap the reward! 

Concentrate – on the present moment.  Smell the candles, savor the food, look at the lights, hear the music and the fireworks, and feel the warmth.  Use all of your senses to stay present in the moment, and by doing so you will maximize your experience in the here and now.  Don’t let the regret of the past or the worry of tomorrow rob you of the good you have to experience right now – at least for a while during this season.  Try it – it works!

I hope these ideas will help you gain all the peace, happiness, self-care, and enjoyment you can find this holiday season!  If you are stuck this holiday season and are not sure how to move forward, contact me today for your 1/2 hour complimentary session where we outline actions you can take immediately!

What other ways do you personally use to bring meaning and fulfillment to your holidays?  Please share below in the comments section.

 

Leslie Ferris is a Certified and Credentialed Life Coach

Serving the parents of struggling tweens, teens, and young adults

Contact her today for your 1/2 complimentary discussion to explore what life coaching can do for you.

Connect with her via her website at http://www.phase2foryou.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/Phase2ForYou

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/Leslie_Ferris

LinkedIn:   www.linkedin.com/in/leslieferris/

Click here for the Audio and Workbook – 4 Giant Pitfalls to Avoid While Your Child Is In Recovery

This is a great gift for yourself or a friend!

Dec 09

The 3 G’s – How to Have a Satisfying Holiday Season – Even When Your Child Is Struggling

The 3 G's - Give, Grow, and Gratitude.

The 3 G’s – Give, Grow, and Gratitude.

The holidays can be a particularly hard time for parents of struggling kids.  Our children may be away at treatment or physically and emotionally estranged from us.  It might seem inappropriate to make merry and be jolly, as the season seems to encourage us to try to do.  In spite of this, there are things we can do to make the holidays satisfying and meaningful.

Here are 3 ideas:

Give.  No matter how dire our own circumstances, it feels good to give.  Especially this time of year, the giving possibilities are endless.  We can put a dollar in the Salvation Army bell ringer’s pot, give to Toys for Tots, spend time with a lonely friend, or work at a soup kitchen.  Honestly, it doesn’t matter what it is, because it is all giving, and giving is every bit as good for the giver as it is for the receiver.  Find the way that works best for you!

GrowGive yourself the gift of personal growth this season.  Read a book (see my recommended reading list), learn about your child’s diagnosis, hire a coach, go to a parent support meeting, etc.  Working on yourself is one of the best things you can do for your child.  Don’t miss the opportunity while your child is struggling to learn and grow from it yourself.  There is no right or wrong way to do this, but there is a best way for YOU.

Gratitude.  Barry Neil Kaufman says it best in his quote, “Gratitude is one of the sweet shortcuts to finding peace of mind and happiness inside. No matter what is going on outside of us, there’s always something we could be grateful for.”  The secret for us parents of struggling kids is to identify those things that we truly have to be grateful for, and to express that gratitude.  This process will keep us focused on what is right in our lives, and not on what difficulties our child is going through.

My hope for you is that you find meaning, enjoyment, and peace this holiday season.

There is more to come.  Stay tuned next week for The 3 C’s – More Ways to Add Meaning to You Holiday Season – Even If Your Child Is Struggling.

 

Leslie Ferris is a Certified and Credentialed Life Coach

Serving the parents of struggling tweens, teens, and young adults

Contact her today for your 1/2 complimentary discussion to explore what life coaching can do for you.

Connect with her via her website at http://www.phase2foryou.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/Phase2ForYou

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/Leslie_Ferris

LinkedIn:   www.linkedin.com/in/leslieferris/

Click here to access our Audio and Workbook – 4 Giant Pitfalls to Avoid While Your Child Is In Recovery

This is a great gift for yourself or a friend!

Nov 17

Parents of Struggling Kids: Go Through It, Not Around It

through

Go through it. Do you see the light at the end of the tunnel?

One who gains strength by overcoming obstacles possesses the only strength which can overcome adversity. – Albert Schweitzer

They say that what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.  Do you believe that?

I certainly do.  I have heard many a parent of a struggling child, once most of the crisis has passed, say that they, their child, and their entire family are all stronger and happier due to the experience.   And because of this I urge you go through the experience to its fullest, and don’t try to go around it.

If this sounds incredibly ridiculous, very annoying, or even impossible – just hold on.  I understand how you might think this is really a stupid idea.  Just hold on, and go through it, and not around it.  You’ll see.

What exactly do I mean by ‘go through it’?  I mean engage deeply, cry, laugh, seek to understand, talk, grieve, go to therapy, hire a coach, read everything, focus on personal growth, get the right support team, share, learn what ‘letting go’ means, and help others.  On the contrary, don’t be in denial, numb your pain, or otherwise check out of the process.

The ‘all in’ attitude is what enables those parents who emerge stronger than ever to do so.  They are able to use the experience as a catalyst to think, feel, and act different and hence not only is their child better off, but they are too!

“However mean your life is, meet it and live it.”   ― Henry David Thoreau

Does this make sense to you?  If it doesn’t, if you think I am nuts – I want to know that.  On the flip side, if you have truly come through what you once thought was an impossible situation and are now stronger for it, please comment below also.  I want to hear it all!

 

Leslie Ferris is a Certified and Credentialed Life Coach

Serving the parents of struggling tweens, teens, and young adults

Contact her today for your 1/2 complimentary discussion to explore what life coaching can do for you.

Connect with her via her website at http://www.phase2foryou.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/Phase2ForYou

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/Leslie_Ferris

LinkedIn:   www.linkedin.com/in/leslieferris/

 

Nov 11

Parents: Are you using your intuition enough?

Which way,  your head or your intuition?

Which way, your head or your intuition?

“Nothing comes unannounced, but many can miss the announcement. So it’s very important to actually listen to your own intuition rather than driving through it.”  – Terence McKenna

And so it goes with us parents of struggling kids.  At some gut level, we know (or have known) that there is something wrong.  But our heads can get in the way of our gut, and talk ourselves out of what we deeply know.  It can go something like this:

Your son comes home from an evening out.  He stumbles a little and heads straight for his room, shuts the door, and goes right to sleep.  Your gut tells you to investigate further.  Your head says, ‘He’s had a long week and he’s probably just really tired’, so you just let it pass.  Your head just talked you out of what your gut told you to do.

Your 7th grade daughter has gone from loving and outgoing, to dark, solitary, and secretive.  You tell yourself, ’7th grade is hard and this is probably just a normal stage’, while your gut is alarmed that this could be serious.

 “What good is intuition if your heart gets in the way of hearing it?”  – Shannon L. Alder

The bottom line is that our gut, our intuition, doesn’t lie but our heads can make up stories and justifications like crazy to counter what our gut tells us.  I have learned that our gut is pretty darn smart, and we should listen a whole lot more to it.

How then, can we get out of our heads enough to listen to our intuition?  That would be different for everyone, but here are 3 simple suggestions:

 

  1.  Know that your intuition is there for a reason, and that its value is immeasurable.  Learn to understand it and trust it.  It is one of the biggest assets you have.
  2. Clear you mind enough so that you can listen to your gut.  Paul Burnon states is eloquently here.  “This withdrawal from the day’s turmoil into creative silence is not a luxury, a fad, or a futility. It is a necessity, because it tries to provide the conditions wherein we are able to yield ourselves to intuitive leadings, promptings, warnings, teachings, and counsels and also to the inspiring peace of the soul. It dissolves mental tensions and heals negative emotions.”  ― Paul Brunton, The Notebooks of Paul Brunton
  3. Come right out and ask yourself, ‘Is my head overriding my gut right now?”.  Be aware, think about it.  Question yourself!   You might be surprised about what you find out!

 

When have you used your intuition?  And how did it work for you?  Please share in the comments below.

 

Leslie Ferris is a Certified and Credentialed Life Coach

Serving the parents of struggling tweens, teens, and young adults

Contact her today for your 1/2 complimentary discussion to explore what life coaching can do for you.

Connect with her via her website at http://www.phase2foryou.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/Phase2ForYou

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/Leslie_Ferris

LinkedIn:   www.linkedin.com/in/leslieferris/

Nov 06

Parents of Struggling Kids: Are You Suffering In Isolation?

Isolation

Solitude vivifies; Isolation kills.
- Joseph Roux

As a parent of a struggling child, do you find that you are isolating yourself more than you used to?  Do you skip social events?  Have you stopped attending worship services?  Do you make up excuses so that you don’t have to be around people?

If the answer is yes, consider yourself normal.  Is that a relief?

Yes, it is very common for parents of kids who are struggling in any way to back away from their family, friends, and other vital parts of their social community.  We can shy away from public events, stop calling our friends, and even hide in the grocery isle to avoid people we know.

Even though this is common and somewhat ‘normal’, the problem is that it really only hurts us more in the long run.  We parents of troubled kids can have a lot of shame, and as Brene Brown explains in her very popular book, The Gifts of Imperfection, shame thrives in secrecy and isolation.  Though I am not a ‘shame’ expert, my guess is that some of our tendency to isolate roots in the shame we feel around our situation.  And if so, then isolation will only serve to foster and grow the shame, where connection, community, and telling our story, will serve as shame busters.

‘We don’t heal in isolation, but in community’.  - S. Kelley Harrell

And not to add confusion, but our possible need for solitude should not be mistaken with isolation.  We need time.  We need time to be by ourselves, sort out what has happened, learn from it, grow from it, formulate plans, etc.  Can you discern the difference between that beneficial kind of solitude and isolation?  Only you will be able to know for sure.  Perhaps the following question can help you:

Do you feel more at peace after your time alone, or do you just feel worse and want to isolate more?

If the answer is the latter, then I urge to examine what you are doing. Get out, find someone to talk to tell your story, find your community.  Help is out there and it is up to you to find it.  There are religious organizations, support groups, therapists, coaches, neighbors and friends who want to help, and really do share similar experiences.  You are not alone!

I urge you to use your ½ hour complimentary coaching session as a way to help you begin to come out of your isolation, and find the help you need and deserve.  Contact me today to schedule it!

So I ask you.  Have you isolated in the past, or are you doing it now?  How have you ‘come out’ of it, and what did that do for you?  Please share in the comments section below!

 

Leslie Ferris is a Certified and Credentialed Life Coach

Serving the parents of struggling tweens, teens, and young adults

Contact her today for your 1/2 complimentary discussion to explore what life coaching can do for you.

Connect with her via her website at http://www.phase2foryou.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/Phase2ForYou

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/Leslie_Ferris

LinkedIn:   www.linkedin.com/in/leslieferris/

 

Oct 28

Parents Of Struggling Kids: Where Has The Fun And Laughter Gone?

iStock_000005872261XSmall

“He who laughs, lasts.”

“What soap is to the body, laughter is to the soul.” – Yiddish Proverb

Every October, my husband and I host a Halloween party for our neighborhood.  This event has turned into a tradition for us and our friends.  It is maybe, with rare exception, the one night every year when everyone cuts loose, dresses in silly costumes and reverts to their younger juvenile self.   This provides us funny stories to recount all year, and gives comic relief to an otherwise over-stressed life filled with demanding jobs, raising teens, caring for aged parents, etc.

The fun and laughter we had at the party this year made me realize how parents of struggling kids can stop having fun, being silly, joking around, and seeing the humor in the every day occurrence.  The worry, guilt, pressure, and constant stress really take a toll on us, and then ‘out the window’ goes that very real healing quality that laughter can bring.

We all know that laughter feels downright good, and there is plenty of evidence out there citing proof that the benefits are truly real.  I found a great article on this very thing on WebMD, and I was surprised to even find a not-for-profit organization called LaughterHeals.org dedicated to promoting healing through laughter.

Have you forgone your fun lately in lieu of more stress and worry?  When is the last time you did or said something ridiculous and then laughed till you cried about it?  Maybe it is time for some gut busting laughter and a good old-fashioned fun time.  I promise, the issues that may be sapping your life void of fun right now will be there when you return from your humor break!

What did you used to do that brought you the benefits of lots of joy and laughter?  And how can you get some of that back now?

Let me know – I want to hear about it in the comments below!

 

Leslie Ferris is a Certified and Credentialed Life Coach

Serving the parents of struggling tweens, teens, and young adults

Contact her today for your 1/2 complimentary discussion to explore what life coaching can do for you.

Connect with her via her website at http://www.phase2foryou.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/Phase2ForYou

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/Leslie_Ferris

LinkedIn:   www.linkedin.com/in/leslieferris/

Oct 07

3 Simple Reasons Why Being In Nature Can Help You

"Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower."   - Albert Camus

“Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower.” – Albert Camus

“I go to nature to be soothed and healed, and to have my senses put in order.”  – John Burroughs

Yep that right, you don’t have to go very far to find verification that there is incredible healing power in nature.  Google it and you’ll get about a ba-zillion hits – no need for me to try to summarize all of that here.  It’s all out there for you if you want to find it.  What I do want to do however is to convince you as a parent of a struggling child to give it a try.  Get out there and see, smell, and hear some nature for your own benefit.  Because I know with all certainty that it helps!

As outlined in The Healing Power of Nature by Debra Manchester MacMannis, LCSW, on www.psychcentral.com, being in nature has some real documented healing qualities for kids, especially those with ADHD.  And what’s interesting is that at least to some degree, it has a positive effect on us parents too.  And why is that?

Really, there could be a whole bunch of reasons, and many might be a lot more scientific than these – but this is what I have found:

 

  1. Nature can help us be present in the moment for a while during a time in our lives that may be too often consumed with fear and worry.  When we are smelling the fresh air, looking at a beautiful panorama, or concentrating on hiking a trail, our minds are at least momentarily in the present moment and therefore have let go of past regrets or future ‘What-ifs’ (aka – worrying about what might happen….).
  2. When we get out of our normal habitat and out into the open, some fresh perspectives tend to come to light.  Some quiet (or at least different) time in nature has a way of opening up our minds and letting some fresh thoughts in, which can me most useful in difficult times like these. 
  3. We are likely getting some exercise along with our nature jaunt – a double win.   Another well known fact is that exercise is a mind clearer, and stress reliever.   Whether we are walking around our neighborhood or city streets, are in a park, or are mountain hiking, we are getting the double benefit of exercise!

 

 “If one way be better than another, that you may be sure is nature’s way”.  – Aristotle

 “Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better”.  – Albert Einstein

 

It’s so true that nature heals.  The ancient philosophers knew it, the great physicist Albert Einstein knew it, and we know it too.  It’s just a matter of putting some nature time into our days.

Autumn is my favorite time of year.  I love the beautiful colors, the crisp apples, the cool night air, and the promise of change in the wind.   I try especially hard this time of year to get out there and experience it, because I know that soon the leaves will drop and all of my perennials will take their extended siesta.  I suppose it is that inevitability that prompts me the most.

How about you?  What will it take to get you out there enjoying a little bit of nature?

 

Leslie Ferris is a Certified and Credentialed Life Coach

Serving the parents of struggling tweens, teens, and young adults

Cotact her today for your 1/2 complimentary discussion to explore what life coaching can do for you.

Connect with her via her website at http://www.phase2foryou.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/Phase2ForYou

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/Leslie_Ferris

LinkedIn:   www.linkedin.com/in/leslieferris/

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